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Court rules enough probable cause for Kyle Rittenhouse case to go to trial

KENOSHA, Wis. — There is enough evidence to warrant a trial for an Illinois 17-year-old accused of killing two men and wounding a third during a night of unrest in Wisconsin, a court commissioner ruled Thursday after a contentious hearing in which the defendant’s lawyer tried to show he had acted in self-defense.

Kyle Rittenhouse, of Antioch, Illinois, is charged with homicide and attempted homicide for the Aug. 25 fatal shootings of Joseph Rosenbaum and Anthony Huber and the wounding of Gaige Grosskreutz during a night of unrest two days after the police shooting in Kenosha of Jacob Blake, a local Black man.

During a preliminary hearing conducted via video, Kenosha County Circuit Court Commissioner Loren Keating found that there was enough probable cause for the case to proceed to trial. Rittenhouse, who wore a covering over his nose and mouth, attended the Zoom hearing from the office of his

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Can city workers run for office? North Miami will change rules after attorney blunder

Three government employees have resigned and a fourth has withdrawn her candidacy for Miami commission after North Miami’s city attorney realized late last month that the city code does not allow North Miami employees to run for public office.

On Wednesday, the North Miami city council voted, 5-0, in favor of amending a city ordinance to allow employees to run for office in other jurisdictions but to require them to resign once they’re elected. The measure must be approved again at the commission’s next meeting before it becomes law.

“Our code should not preclude somebody from running for office,” Councilman Scott Galvin said. “I would like to see this measure pass to allow greater participation in American democracy.”

Galvin and Vice Mayor Alix Desulme said they would prefer for the amendment to go further by allowing city employees to keep their jobs even while serving in elected office outside

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US pushes ahead with new rules for Chinese firms



a close up of a sign: US and Chinese flags


© Getty Images
US and Chinese flags

The US House of Representatives has passed a law to kick Chinese companies off US stock exchanges if they do not comply with the its auditing rules.

The act would also require companies to disclose whether they are owned or controlled by a foreign government.

The Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act still needs the President’s approval.

The move coincides with a wider push to ramp up pressure on China in the final months of the Trump presidency.

In addition to the act, the US government on Wednesday moved to ban cotton imports from a company it says uses the forced labour of detained Uighur Muslims.

The US also took action against Chinese-manufactured twist ties last week, taking the rare step of imposing tariffs to counter the effects of what the US claims is Chinese currency manipulation.

China too has increased pressure, introducing export

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Court rules famous marriage vows mean nothing i

Justice Janet Mulwa held the court had no powers to force a broken marriage to hold together merely because the couple exchanged vows

– The judge said the famous marriage vows were not meant to enslave one and subject him or her to a torturous life

– A magistrate court had dismissed the petition on grounds that the couple had vowed to stay together for better, for worse, unless the marriage turned irretrievably broken

A High Court judge has ruled marriage vows do not hold water when a dispute or divorce case is filed before a court of law.

For better, for worse: Court rules famous marriage vows mean nothing in law

Justice Janet Mulwa. Photo: Daily Nation.
Source: UGC

Justice Janet Mulwa who delivered the ruling on Monday, November 31, said a court of law has no powers to force a broken marriage to hold together merely because the couple exchanged vows.

While bringing to a closure a divorce case of a

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The Trump-Biden transition isn’t the first to disregard rules and traditions

President Trump’s attacks on the election of Joe Biden are unprecedented, but bitterness over losing is nearly as old as the presidency.

Since George Washington handed the keys to John Adams, the transfer of power between presidents has been complicated, sometimes spiteful and occasionally harrowing, but it has ultimately always been peaceful.

Sure, the country is best served if incoming and outgoing teams play nicely together, experts say. But some of the most successful U.S. presidents overcame rocky transitions and lousy relationships with their predecessors.

Here’s how the process is supposed to go, according to law and tradition:

After his own too-short transition from Bill Clinton's administration in 2000, George W. Bush determined that his 2008 handoff to Barack Obama would be the smoothest in history.
After his own too-short transition from Bill Clinton’s administration in 2000, George W. Bush determined that his 2008 handoff to Barack Obama would be the smoothest in history. (2010 photo by Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post)

Before the election

U.S. law requires that the current administration prepare to help potential newcomers before the

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“No spouse is entitled to half of property upon divorce” – Court of Appeal rules [ARTICLE]

Kenya’s Court of Appeal has reportedly ruled that no spouse is entitled to half of the other’s property upon divorce.

According to Tuko.co.ke, the appellate court’s ruling was in response to a case in which a woman identified as BMM was awarded 50% of property in Kenya and the United Kingdom (UK).

The Court of Appeal has overturned the High Court ruling which favoured the woman, ordering it be heard afresh, the news website further reported.

The High Court presided over by Justice William Musyoka had earlier pronounced that married partners would automatically get 50% of property in case they want to go their separate ways.

READ ALSO: Lady given needle and thread to sew her ripped jeans before she obtains ID card

But three Court of Appeal judges Hannah Okwengu, Patrick Kiage and Sankale ole Kantai said it was wrong for Musyoka to make such a decree, saying it

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German government can’t force US to follow international law on drone strikes, court rules

BERLIN — Germany’s top administrative court has ruled the country’s government can’t be forced to ensure that U.S. drone strikes controlled via an American military base on German territory are in line with international law.

The decision Wednesday by the Federal Administrative Court in Leipzig overturns a ruling last year that held the German government partly responsible for making sure that such military operations comply with international law.

The ruling restores a lower court decision in 2015 that concluded the German government had fulfilled its legal duties and was within its rights to balance them with “foreign and defense policy interests.”

The case was brought by human rights groups on behalf of three Yemeni plaintiffs who allege their relatives were killed in a U.S. drone strike in 2012. They alleged that the U.S. air base in Ramstein, southern Germany, plays a key role in the relay of flight control data

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Court rules no spouse is entitled to half of property upon divorce



Court rules no spouse is entitled to half of property upon divorce


© Provided by Tuko
Court rules no spouse is entitled to half of property upon divorce

The Court of Appeal has ruled that no spouse is entitled to half of property upon divorce dealing a major blow to married couples.

Three Court of Appeal judges said equality of spouses does not involve the re-distribution of property rights at the dissolution of marriage. Photo: DCI.

Source: Facebook

The appellate court which handles appeals arising over the decisions of the High Court as well as any other court or tribunal was responding to a case where a woman identified as BMM had been awarded 50% of property in Kenya and the United Kingdom (UK) ordering it be heard afresh.

While setting aside the pronouncement made by High Court Justice William Musyoka, three Court of Appeal judges Hannah Okwengu, Patrick Kiage and Sankale ole Kantai said it was wrong for Musyoka to make

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PM rules out martial law

Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha yesterday rebutted speculation that there could be another military coup or the enforcement of martial law to quell the current spate of anti-government protests ahead of a planned mass event in front of the Crown Property Bureau tomorrow.

Razor wire is installed on the walls of the Crown Property Bureau on Phitsanulok Road as part of stepped-up security ahead of a planned protest by pro-democracy demonstrators tomorrow.

After the government met to prepare for the Ratsadon group’s demonstration, the premier said the government was trying to prevent confrontations between opposing protest groups and pledged equal enforcement the law againt both sides.

Gen Prayut said the government would not discriminate against anyone and called on the protesters to be considerate of the officers whose job it is to maintain order.

He also stressed that martial law would not be introduced to prevent this or future rallies and

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New virus rules threaten California’s October job gains

California’s beleaguered restaurant and hospitality industry rebounded in October, adding 66,000 jobs last month as the unemployment rate in the nation’s most populous state dipped below 10% for the first time since the pandemic upended the state’s economy in March.

But the gains are likely to be short-lived as a surge of cases has already prompted new restrictions on businesses, including forcing most restaurants to halt indoor dining during the cold and rainy winter months. Starting Saturday, the state will enforce a 10 p.m. curfew that could further curtail people’s leisure spending.

“With the renewed lockdowns, these jobs are in peril now,” said Michael Bernick, an attorney for the Duane Morris law firm and former director of California’s Employment Development Department.

California Labor Secretary Julie Su said the rise in newly reported coronavirus cases is a reminder “how our economy is tied to the ongoing public health crisis.”

“California’s ongoing

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