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Elected as reformer, Jefferson County’s incoming district attorney is pushing out office’s top prosecutors

Alexis King

Alexis King convinced voters in Jefferson and Gilpin counties that she should be their next district attorney on the promise that she’d reform the prosecutor’s office — and she hasn’t waited to be sworn in to make sweeping changes.

King will cut 10 people from the First Judicial District Attorney’s Office when she takes charge in January, she acknowledged in a brief interview Thursday. Those losing their jobs include six senior prosecutors and three deputy district attorneys, those involved told The Denver Post, wiping away decades of experience and senior leadership in the office.

“At the end of the day, it’s about ensuring that we are bringing and performing ethical prosecutions, protecting public safety, that are also aligned with my values and making sure we have a workplace that is open to all identities,” King said Thursday, adding the dismissals are “100%” part of her effort to reform

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Former Trump lawyer Sidney Powell still pushing conspiracy-filled election lawsuits

Experts say the suits, though long shots, are “doing real damage.”

“We will prevail,” Powell wrote on Twitter this week. “Patriots are united like never before to shine the light of Truth across our land.”

Since filing a suit in Georgia last week, Powell has added a federal lawsuit in Michigan and plans another in Wisconsin, according to another lawyer on the team. Each case alleges a complex plot involving shadowy foreign interests, the company that sells electronic voting machines, Republican elected officials,

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Editorial: California voters are pushing ahead with criminal reform

Here, there and seemingly everywhere on California ballots last week was the topic of criminal justice. The issue came in the form of reform-minded candidates, parolee voting rights, police policies and cash bail. The varying guises all asked the same question: how do voters feel about crime?

Time was when California was a law-and-order citadel. The state built a huge prison system with a budget larger than that for its public universities. It delineated strict sentences to punish the guilty and take jail terms out of the hands of judges. Three state Supreme Court justices were voted from office in 1986 because of voter doubts they would enforce the death penalty. The 1994 “three strikes” law obliging long terms to repeat offenders won approval by nearly three quarters of the electorate.

Then that era began to fade. Crime rates began dropping over the last decade. Set-in-stone sentencing was eased. The

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Pandemic is pushing more Coloradans to file for divorce

DENVER (KDVR) — Divorce rates continue to climb in Colorado during the pandemic and family law attorneys say they’ve never seen anything like it before.

Stress and financial fallout tend to be the biggest factors.

According to some new data, divorce filings nationally jumped up by 34% from March through June (compared to the same time last year).

At the Harris Law Firm in Denver, that figure is even higher.

“We’ve seen a 98% increase since January. So that’s year to date. In total numbers of divorced clients hiring our firm,” said Rich Harris, principle of the Harris Law Firm.

According to Harris, the conditions that cause divorce are really intense right now.

Some of those conditions include:

  • Economic fallout, such as unemployment.
  • Couples being cooped up together more at home (leads to tense moments)
  • Pressures of home schooling and kids.

“And then on top of everything else you’ve got

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