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Gift from Rose Law Firm funds public interest fellowships | William H. Bowen School of Law

The UA Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law has received a gift from Rose Law Firm as part of its 200th anniversary philanthropic initiative. The law school will use the funds to create two public interest fellowships.

“Rose Law Firm has been blessed to survive and thrive for two centuries. It is in that spirit of gratitude that we have committed to give back to our community in honor of our 200th anniversary. These gifts will benefit several legal aid, nonprofit and educational institutions in our state, including the UA Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law,” said managing member Robyn Allmendinger.

The public interest fellowship is an emerging initiative at Bowen. Through these fellowships, the school will provide monetary stipends to student fellows filling unpaid positions providing public service during the summer semester.  The program supports Bowen’s core values of access to justice, public service,

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Former Gordhan spokesperson says public enterprises department targeting whistle-blowers

By Siviwe Feketha Time of article published12h ago

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Johannesburg – Public Enterprises Minister Pravin Gordhan is again caught up in an irregular appointment scandal.

This time, he is pressured to produce the qualifications of his chief of staff after ongoing claims that she did not qualify for the job.

This comes after the spokesperson for the Department of Public Enterprises (DPE), controversial journalist Sam Mkokeli, openly bashed an ongoing forensic investigation into those who leaked information on Nthabiseng Borotho.

Gordhan is accused of having approved Borotho’s appointment last year despite her not having a matric certificate.

Borotho is also believed to have been a “runner” in President Cyril Ramaphosa’s CR17 campaign where Gordhan was campaign principal. She is also accused of having employed two of her relatives in the department.

On Sunday, the protracted controversy around Borotho’s qualifications and suitability for her post

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Local public health orders continue to present enforcement headaches | News

Although Pitkin County recently adopted its own “orange plus” level of COVID-19 related restrictions, whose job it is to enforce the added public health measures remains a point of contention. 

“I don’t know that it is any of our jobs to do this,” Pitkin County Sheriff Joe DiSalvo said during last week’s board of health meeting. “I know that sounds impolite — that it’s not my job — I wish I had a better way to say it.”

Since the onset of the pandemic last spring, DiSalvo has favored ‘education over enforcement’ with respect to carrying out public health orders and believed the county’s police departments agreed.

In July, when the Aspen City Council implemented a mandatory face-covering zone, the Aspen Police Department had to constantly inform individuals of the local public health order.

“We made in the range of about 8,000 contacts,” Assistant Police Chief Bill Linn said in

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Local public health orders continue to present enforcement headaches |

Although Pitkin County recently adopted its own “orange plus” level of COVID-19 related restrictions, whose job it is to enforce the added public health measures remains a point of contention. 

“I don’t know that it is any of our jobs to do this,” Pitkin County Sheriff Joe DiSalvo said during last week’s board of health meeting. “I know that sounds impolite — that it’s not my job — I wish I had a better way to say it.”

Since the onset of the pandemic last spring, DiSalvo has favored ‘education over enforcement’ with respect to carrying out public health orders and believed the county’s police departments agreed.

In July, when the Aspen City Council implemented a mandatory face-covering zone, the Aspen Police Department had to constantly inform individuals of the local public health order.

“We made in the range of about 8,000 contacts,” Assistant Police Chief Bill Linn said in

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Lawsuit challenges Dane County’s public health order banning indoor gatherings

MADISON, Wis. —  A lawsuit that was filed in Wisconsin’s Supreme Court on Monday looks to overturn the gathering ban and restrictions recently put into place by Public Health Madison and Dane County.

The new public health order, which went into effect Wednesday, bans indoor mass gatherings with anyone outside of your household and limits outdoor gatherings to no more than 10 people.

According to PHMDC’s website, in-person games, sports, group exercise classes, movies, conferences and similar events are all considered mass gatherings. You can read more about Emergency Order #10 here.

The lawsuit was filed by the Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty on behalf of Gymfinity Ltd., Jeffry Becker and Andrea Klein. It argues the order is an overreach of the legal authority granted to local health officers and

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Program Successful in Increasing Private Donations to Public Universities

A new study suggests that the Texas Research Incentive Program (TRIP) has succeeded in boosting the amount of private donations to public universities, indicating that policymakers can effectively leverage public investment to spur private donations.

The authors of the analysis, published in the American Educational Research Journal, note that further questions warrant study – such as whether the TRIP model increases institutional inequity over time.

Under the 2009 law that created TRIP, seven public “emerging research universities” were made eligible to receive matching funds from the state for gifts or endowment donations received from private sources: the University of Houston, University of North Texas, Texas Tech University and four of the University of Texas branch campuses. Texas State University was added to that list in 2013. TRIP-eligible colleges were selected based on a set of metrics such as the number of doctoral degrees awarded and faculty quality.

Researchers used

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The future of public transportation is on the line in Massachusetts

Just one year ago, some 1.3 million people rode the subway, bus, ferry, or commuter rail on an average workday in Massachusetts. Today, thanks to the coronavirus pandemic and the shutdown of work and everyday life as we knew it, the number of daily riders is down to 300,000. They work in hospitals, small businesses, and grocery stores. They take care of the elderly and disabled or have other jobs and commitments that don’t afford them the luxury of staying home or working remotely.

With that drastic drop in ridership, the MBTA has proposed drastic service cuts that, if approved, would be rolled out next year. “We do this with great regret,” said MBTA general manager Steve Poftak in an interview. “This is an unprecedented financial situation. . . . We are doing our best to manage through this.”

That perspective implies that the pandemic-controlled world we see today is

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‘Love jihad’ laws attempt to divert public attention: Owaisi

The Hyderabad MP told reporters that such laws would be a violation of Article 14 and Article 21 of the Constitution of India. “They (the BJP-ruled state) should read the Constitution. They are going far ahead in their hatred. This won’t work,” said Owaisi.

The MP pointed out that choice is a fundamental right under Article 21 and as ruled by the Supreme Court. He wanted to know if the government would repeal the Special Marriages Act.

“Crores of people have lost jobs due to coronavirus. The government can’t give jobs. The GDP has become zero and the government is unable to do anything about it. The country requires jobs. Migrant labourers are facing severe hardships, the economy is down and children are slipping into child labour, but to divert issues from all this, they are resorting to dramabazi,” he said.

Owaisi reiterated that the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act is

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When COVID-19 struck, SC public housing agencies took thousands from renters’ tax refunds | News

South Carolina’s public housing agencies took more than $100,000 from their former tenants’ tax refunds in the early months of the pandemic, clawing back money for old debts just as the federal government scrambled to keep families’ finances afloat.

While much of the economy was hampered by public health restrictions and an invading virus, South Carolina continued to siphon off people’s tax refunds unabated. From March until May, it held back workers’ tax refunds on behalf of two dozen public housing authorities, which provide homes for poor and working-class South Carolinians.

What’s more, because of the state’s weak requirements for warning someone that their refund is in jeopardy, they may not have had a chance to dispute the charge. State law allows housing authorities to evict someone from their apartment and send a garnishment notice letter to the very same address after they are gone.



Charleston Housing Authority

Ashley Oaks is located on

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Gov. Beshear orders public, private schools to close classrooms starting Monday | In-depth

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) — Gov. Andy Beshear has ordered Kentucky’s public and private schools to close classrooms starting Monday as COVID-19 cases continue to soar throughout the state.

Beshear announced the sweeping edict during a news conference Wednesday detailing steps his administration will take to curb the spread of COVID-19. It’s the first time Beshear has ordered, rather than recommended, schools to cease in-person instruction in response to the pandemic.

“If we are going to be able to provide meaningful educational experiences, in-person especially, at the beginning of the next semester, we have to take action now,” he said.

“We will make every effort to make sure that in January we have the opportunity to return to in-person instruction,” Beshear said.

The governor said elementary schools can resume classroom instruction Dec. 7 if their counties drop from “red” and districts adhere to public health guidance. Middle and high schools can

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