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Art and artists in martial-law Manila

It was November 1972. Martial law had been inflicted upon the land, following the fake ambush of Defense Secretary Juan Ponce Enrile. My magazine the Graphic had been padlocked, along with the rest of the magazines and newspapers, except for the crony paper Daily Express. I was out of a job, like many in media.

A few months later, while trying to earn a living translating lachrymose Spanish-language comics into Tagalog, courtesy of Morita Roces, I learned that Purita Kalaw Ledesma, the founder of the Art Association of the Philippines (AAP), had been looking high and low for me. It turned out that Mrs. Ledesma needed, not a critic (who would just quarrel with her), but a collaborating writer who, as she pointed out good-naturedly, knew “next to nothing about art.” The task was to write a history of the AAP.

That was my introduction to the world of Philippine

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The Lost Art of the Steal

Photograph Source: Paul Sableman – CC BY 2.0

What’s the matter with Donald Trump and the Republican Party that they are making such a hash of stealing an election? Why are they making such a mockery of our finest political tradition? Have they no sense of history?

In 2000, even the hopelessly inept George W. Bush (“Is our children learning?”) figured out how, after 18,000 residents in Palm Beach county mistakenly cast their votes for Patrick Buchanan, the Supreme Court could deny an accurate recount of the errantly dimpled chads (“for the sake of our democracy…”) and grant him the presidency, as if part of an inheritance.

In 1960, John F. Kennedy decided that to win the presidency he would need, among his vote counters, Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley (“vote early and vote often…”) and Texas Senator Lyndon Baines Johnson (running as JFK’s

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DA’s office art contest honors Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Santa Clara County high school students are getting the chance to honor late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in the annual “Justice For All” poster contest held by the District Attorney’s Office.

“Justice Ginsburg once said: ‘To make life a little better for people less fortunate than you, that is what I think a meaningful life is. One lives not just for oneself but for one’s community.’ The Justice found that meaning, fighting for equality — and living it, with intelligence, hard work, dignity and charm,” Santa Clara County District Attorney Jeff Rosen said in a release. “She has been a major influence on so many people, including my wife, my daughters, and me.”

Students have until Jan. 11, 2021 to submit their poster designs that illustrate the legacy of the groundbreaking jurist known as the Notorious RBG and the power of inspiration. Winners will be announced Jan.

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How films and art can help protect Martial Law memory from revisionism

MANILA, Philippines — The victims of Martial Law and their families’ quest for justice continues more than three decades since the Marcos dictatorship fell, and in 2020, they are called to engage in yet another fight: One against historical revisionism that would erase what they have been through.

While the Philippines continues to grapple with a pandemic, lawmakers at the House of Representatives on September 1 approved on third and final reading a bill declaring September 11 as a special non-working holiday in Ilocos Norte to commemorate the birthday of the late dictator — seen as another move to rehabilitate the Marcos name.

Sen. Imee Marcos earlier this year also attempted to push the narrative that “Masagana 99,” her father’s pet agriculture project was “effective” and a success at a Senate hearing but she was promptly corrected by Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez III, the agriculture secretary who “cleaned up the

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Filipino martial art stages comeback in its native land

MANILA — Batman will never know it, but the caped crusader played a big role in the career of Daniel Bernas, a world champion in the Filipino martial art of arnis. As an 18-year-old university student, Bernas chose arnis for his physical education class after reading a Batman comic book that featured a character using this fighting form.

Bernas’ entry into arnis through Western comics is unusual for an indigenous martial art whose roots lie in the era before the Philippines became a Spanish colony in the 16th century, when the islands were ruled by local chieftains.

But his story reflects the roundabout history of arnis, which after decades in the doldrums is seeing a revival in the Philippines partly because of its popularity abroad. Also known as kali, escrima and Filipino martial art, arnis was made the country’s official national sport in 2009, replacing sipa, in which

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A Superhuman’s voyage to promote ancient Martial Art

 Grand Master Acharya Mak Yuree Vajramunee was kind enough to reply an emailed interview to Dhaka Tribune regarding the new and unique sport, butthan

It’s been quite a few years that Grand Master Acharya Mak Yuree Vajramunee earned Superhuman status in strength category by Discovery Channel, featured in Ripley’s Believe It or Not and honored with Grandmaster title at the World’s Martial Arts Hall of Fame.

He was also featured on the cover page of multiple international martial arts journals thanks to his amazing feats. 

The illustrious life journey of the Dhaka-born martial artist in the field of self defense and mind training through psychological development had its roots from his early cadet life.

He later went on to become professional defensive tactics and close protection trainer to different government, military and intelligence agencies. 

He founded Bangladeshi combat sports and martial art and named it after Sanskrit word, butthan. 

Yuree

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