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Ask the law: ‘Does filing of a civil suit have to be preceded by a criminal case in UAE?’

The criminal case does not deal with the cause, amount and circumstances of the cheque, which are examined by civil courts.
Image Credit: Shutterstock

Claiming cheque value

Question: I had a cheque from a person that I submitted to the bank, but the bank refused to accept the cheque because it had been issued more than five years ago. I also tried to file a complaint with the police, but they too informed me that it was not possible to open a police case because the legal time-frame to open a case had expired. My question is, does this mean that my right to claim the cheque has been lost? Does the civil law allow a civil suit to be filed even five years after a cheque is issued? Does the law require filing a criminal report against the cheque issuer and then filing a civil case? Please advise.

Answer:

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Biden was pilloried for his criminal justice record. During his presidency, advocates expect change.

As President-elect Joe Biden prepares his transition into the White House, he is facing mounting expectations to bring about sweeping change on criminal justice reform.

As the author of the 1994 crime bill, which was credited in part as ushering in a wave of mass incarceration of mostly Black men, and a vocal proponent of harsh policies during the “war on drugs” era, Biden has a long and often-criticized record on the issue.

He is also coming into power after his predecessor President Donald Trump signed into law one of the most significant changes to the federal criminal justice system in the 21st century. The First Step Act was the result of a bipartisan coalition of lawmakers, civil rights groups, and grassroots activists. Experts said it was a monumental step forward after years of criminal justice reform and “tough on crime” policies being used as a political cudgel in Washington.

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Dozens Arrested During Racial Justice Protests in Denver Still Face Charges

Although six months have passed since racial justice protests started in Denver in the wake of George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police, dozens of those arrested at those actions and other demonstrations around the city are still facing criminal charges.

As of November 18, there were still at least 76 active criminal cases related to protests in the city since May 28.

The active cases are divided between the office of Denver District Attorney Beth McCann and the Denver City Attorney’s Office. The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Colorado is prosecuting at least two more cases related to protests; six demonstrators also face charges connected to Elijah McClain protests in Aurora.

The City Attorney’s Office has dealt with close to 400 cases connected to protests in Denver over the last six months. City Attorney Kristin Bronson dismissed 325 of those cases, many of which were

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Forensics expert calls for Nigeria to fully adopt biometrics in criminal investigations

Nigerian police should consider the full integration of forensic science — which often involves the use of biometrics — in the way cases are investigated and prosecuted in the country’s justice system, an opinion piece argues.

Those championing such calls are arguing that this is even more important for a country that has a very high and growing rate of criminality, especially in the urban centers.

A recent argument as to why Nigeria should adopt forensic science in criminal investigation processes is made in an editorial in Nigerian daily newspaper Vanguard.

In the article, the writer, Avril Eyewu-Edero, a forensic investigator, argued that adopting forensic science will greatly redirect the way criminal cases are currently investigated in Africa’s most populous nation. This, she said, will make it possible for investigators to have sufficient and accurate information about a suspect’s guilt or innocence in any incident they are linked to.

She

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Amid Thailand’s protests, a feared tool to protect the monarchy returns



a group of people in front of a large crowd watching: Amid Thailand’s protests, a feared tool to protect the monarchy returns


© Nachiket Deuskar
Amid Thailand’s protests, a feared tool to protect the monarchy returns

The number 112 strikes fear in Thailand. It refers to Section 112 of the country’s criminal code, which makes insulting or defaming the king and his close kin an offense punishable by three to 15 years in prison.

On Tuesday night, a leader of the protest movement that is calling for changes to Thailand’s monarchy and political system received a summons to face multiple charges of lèse-majesté, as the crime is known. It was the first time that Section 112 had been applied during the protests, which have brought thousands of people onto the streets since July.

The protest leader, Parit Chiwarak, commonly known as Penguin, must report to a police station by Tuesday to face the charges, which stem from speeches he gave in September and this month. In those speeches, Parit and others called

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Farmer unions indulging in criminal activities, had to arrest leaders: Haryana to high court





© Provided by Hindustan Times


The Haryana government has admitted to detention/ arrest of 24 farmer leaders in the state and has told Punjab and Haryana high court that they were arrested as the organisations they belonged to were indulging in criminal activities.

A status report filed by Rakesh Kumar Arya, deputy inspector general of police (law and order), Haryana, says, “ these organisations have history of indulging in criminal activities, creating law and order problem and disturbing public peace and order.” Upon a call given to hold a protest in Delhi on November 26 and November 27, there were inputs that farmers have made elaborate arrangements to halt and block important highways/ roads in the state, the report says adding that hence, arrests were effected.

The information was submitted in a petition filed on Wednesday by Haryana Progressive Farmers Union, a protesters body, alleging illegal detention of its 100

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How to build a search engine for criminal data

Whether it’s a WhatsApp message arranging the distribution of cocaine from São Paulo to Amsterdam or other encrypted conversations to lure the enemy into a deadly ambush; criminals have long tried to keep their digital footprints hidden.

The evidence of crime is all stored in the digital archive: emails, photos, and cloud storage data. Law enforcement agencies can use these digital clues to find out where criminals have been, and what they’re currently doing.

Data analysis platforms are becoming increasingly crucial in the fight against crime. We spoke with two forensic software experts from Hansken about how they support law enforcement agencies, like the Dutch National Police and the Dutch Fiscal Information and Investigation Service. 

Digital digging

No lone detective can efficiently search the vast pool of data stored on confiscated data carriers.

Since 2012, The Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI) has focused on Digital Forensics as a Service (DFaaS) with

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Operation Christmas Presence: Law enforcement to patrol shopping centers during the holidays

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) — Restrictions in place due to the pandemic may limit the number of shoppers allowed inside malls and stores, but authorities will be out in full force.

“We’ll have a larger presence of uniformed personnel out in our shopping centers as well as our shopping corridors. We’ll be using our detective units in plain clothes patrolling those same areas looking for criminal activity,” says Fresno Police Capt. Tom Rowe.

Fresno Police, the Fresno County Sheriff’s Office, and the CHP have been conducting Operation Christmas Presence for 23 years now.

Their sole purpose is to maintain a visible presence to deter criminals from victimizing shoppers during the holiday season.

“Please be safe. Be smart. But understand if you’re out with ill intent, we will come after you, any criminals and bad guys, and put you in jail,” says Capt. Mark Padilla.

And while you’re out shopping, authorities ask

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Critics Want Sacklers To Face Criminal Charges For Role In Opioid Crisis

Newly public documents paint a detailed and often damning portrait of the role played by members of the Sackler family, owners of Purdue Pharma, during years when the privately owned drug company launched criminal schemes designed to “turbocharge” sales of Oxycontin and other highly addictive opioid medications.

In court filings this week, Purdue Pharma admitted extensive criminal wrongdoing as part of a settlement with the Justice Department, including a decade-long conspiracy to deceive the Drug Enforcement Administration that continued until 2017.

“The abuse and diversion of prescription opioids has contributed to a national tragedy of addiction and deaths,” Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen said in a statement after the guilty plea was entered.

This isn’t the first time the company admitted criminal wrongdoing in its effort to boost opioid profits on the Sackler’s watch.

In 2007, the family’s firm pleaded guilty to charges in a DOJ settlement and agreed to

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New law reforms early sentence credit program in Virginia | Local News

Scott said he recognized that including the exemptions would be the only way to get the legislation to the governor’s desk. He said he also wanted to be sensitive to victims and families of victims, which includes his House colleagues who have had loved ones be the victims of violent crimes.

“I try not to be so harsh on people who don’t feel the way I do about this,” said Scott, a criminal defense attorney. “I try to convince with evidence and data. Going forward, I hope we can have more reconciliation.”

Some Democrats opposed the bill, while all of the Republicans voted against it. Republicans said the policy would erode Virginia’s truth-in-sentencing initiative put into place more than two decades ago intended to impose stiffer sentences on violent offenders and mandate people serve at least 85% of their sentences.

Virginia abolished parole in 1995 at the height of the

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