‘Does filing of a civil suit have to be preceded by a criminal case in UAE?’

Claiming cheque value

Question: I had a cheque from a person that I submitted to the bank, but the bank refused to accept the cheque because it had been issued more than five years ago. I also tried to file a complaint with the police, but they too informed me that it was not possible to open a police case because the legal time-frame to open a case had expired. My question is, does this mean that my right to claim the cheque has been lost? Does the civil law allow a civil suit to be filed even five years after a cheque is issued? Does the law require filing a criminal report against the cheque issuer and then filing a civil case? Please advise.

Answer: Yes, you do have the right to file a civil case even if you have lost your right to file a criminal case. Moreover,

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Virginia governor signs criminal justice and police reforms | Ap

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Gov. Ralph Northam on Wednesday signed more than a dozen criminal justice and police reform laws, including a ban on no-knock search warrants, limitations on the use of neck restraints and changes that make it easier to decertify police officers for misconduct.

The legislation was approved by the Democrat-controlled General Assembly during a special legislative session called after a public outcry and nationwide protests over police brutality and racial inequality following the killing of George Floyd while in police custody in Minnesota.

“Too many families, in Virginia and across our nation, live in fear of being hurt or killed by police,” Northam said in a statement.

“These new laws represent a tremendous step forward in rebuilding trust between law enforcement and the communities they serve.”

The new laws include a measure that allows localities to create civilian law enforcement review boards with the authority to issue

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Virginia governor signs criminal justice and police reforms | Wire

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Gov. Ralph Northam on Wednesday signed more than a dozen criminal justice and police reform laws, including a ban on no-knock search warrants, limitations on the use of neck restraints and changes that make it easier to decertify police officers for misconduct.

The legislation was approved by the Democrat-controlled General Assembly during a special legislative session called after a public outcry and nationwide protests over police brutality and racial inequality following the killing of George Floyd while in police custody in Minnesota.

“Too many families, in Virginia and across our nation, live in fear of being hurt or killed by police,” Northam said in a statement.

“These new laws represent a tremendous step forward in rebuilding trust between law enforcement and the communities they serve.”

The new laws include a measure that allows localities to create civilian law enforcement review boards with the authority to issue

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We asked officials about law-breaking Boston police officers. Here’s what they said

The Globe found dozens of Boston police officers whose legal problems just melted away.

The story focused in part on a 2013 car crash caused by then-Detective Robert Tully, who was driving an unmarked cruiser near his home in suburban Rockland. Tully crossed the centerline and hit a car driven by a nurse coming home from work, sending both of them to the hospital.

Hospital records showed Tully had booze on his breath, was slurring his words, and his blood alcohol content was 2.5 times the legal limit. He was never charged with driving under the influence.

The victim’s father asked Rockland police and the Plymouth District Attorney’s Office to request Tully’s toxicology reports from the hospital, but there is no evidence that they ever did. Boston police also failed to investigate thoroughly.

In reporting the story, the Globe received the following statements from public officials, police, and prosecutors:

Boston

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Police use water cannons as they clash with thousands of protesters in France

Police clashed with demonstrators who took to the streets in France today to protest against a proposed security law which civil liberties campaigners say would impinge on freedom of information and media rights.

The pending legislation would create a new criminal offence for publishing images of police officers with intent to cause them harm. Offenders would face a maximum penalty of up to one year in prison and a 45,000 euro (£40,000) fine.

The government says the proposal is intended to protect police officers from online calls for violence. 

But critics fear that, if enacted, the measure would endanger journalists and other observers who take videos of officers at work, especially during violent demonstrations. 

In Paris, an estimated 7,000 demonstrators today gathered on the Trocadero square near the Eiffel Tower, chanting ‘Freedom, freedom’ and ‘Everyone wants to film the police.’

It is understood roughly 22,000 people took part in demonstrations

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New French law banning images of police sparks civil rights concerns, protests

France’s parliament voted to approve a controversial law Friday that will ban the publication of images of on-duty police officers as well as expand the use of surveillance drones and police powers. Journalists’ groups, human rights activists and unions – including Reporters Without Borders and Amnesty International’s French branch – organised protests in Paris and other French cities on Saturday.



a group of people standing in front of a building


© Stephane de Sakutin, AFP


Article 24 of France’s new security bill would make it a criminal offence for anyone to disseminate images that might “harm the physical or mental integrity” of police officers. People found guilty could be punished by a year in prison or a fine of up to €45,000.

Critics of the bill say it threatens to make it more difficult for journalists and others to report on police brutality or other infractions, with journalists’ groups, human rights activists and unions organising the protests in French cities.

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Election law experts tell Michigan Board of Canvassers to certify election

Election law experts and civil rights advocates called on the Michigan Board of Canvassers to certify election results during an online press conference Friday, saying the canvassers’ role is largely a technical one. 

Wayne official says Trump didn’t discuss voting

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“Their duties are ministerial and they must act,” John Pirich, an election law attorney who teaches at the Michigan State University College of Law, said during the press conference hosted by the Michigan ACLU. “It’s so clear under the law what they have to do.”

The ACLU press conference was attended by members of the Detroit NAACP, League of Women Voters, and several attorneys who specialize in election law. They said that the four-member Michigan board has to certify the election results.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

“All that is left is the verification of

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Messenger: COVID-19 brings a death sentence to Missouri prisons, and Parson looks the other way | Tony Messenger

This week’s ruling from the nation’s high court rejected an attempt by two elderly inmates to lift that hold, so the order could be enforced. Sotomayor, joined by Justice Elena Kagan, dissented, saying it was a matter of life and death that the order be enforced.

“The people incarcerated in the Pack Unit are some of our most vulnerable citizens,” Sotomayor wrote. “They face severe risks of serious illness and death from COVID–19, but are unable to take even the most basic precautions against the virus on their own. If the prison fails to enforce social distancing and mask wearing, perform regular testing, and take other essential steps, the inmates can do nothing but wait for the virus to take its toll. Twenty lives have been lost already. I fear the stay will lead to further, needless suffering.”

So it often is in the criminal justice system. Whether it’s somebody

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Health Care Fraud Guide 2020: Focus on Enforcement and Compliance – ResearchAndMarkets.com

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The “Health Care Fraud. Enforcement and Compliance” book has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

Health Care Fraud: Enforcement and Compliance is the most complete, essential and up-to-date guide for criminal and civil lawyers, law enforcement officials, health care providers and anyone interested in the health care industry.

You’ll find discussion of: the latest anti-fraud initiatives from Congress, enforcement agencies and the private bar; advice on criminal law and procedures that health care lawyers cannot afford to ignore; and point-by-point analysis of key decisions, laws and regulations.

This deskbook also helps you decide on the right pretrial and trial strategies for clients who have already run afoul of the rules. It features cutting-edge discussions of such topics as: the use of health care fraud laws to enforce clinical care standards; voluntary and involuntary disclosure obligations; expanded treatment of the Federal Anti-kickback Statute – including “Safe Harbor” regulations –

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Kamala Harris and the Noble Path of the Prosecutor

In the opening of her memoir, “The Truths We Hold,” from 2019, Vice-President-elect Kamala Harris writes that, as a law student, she found her “calling” while interning at the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office, in Oakland, California, in 1988. Harris then spent nearly three decades in law enforcement, referring to herself as “top cop,” rising from local prosecutor to district attorney of San Francisco and then attorney general of California—the first woman and the first Black person in these jobs—until she joined the U.S. Senate, in 2017.

When I was in law school, twenty years ago, prosecution was a form of public service that was thought to carry little controversial baggage. Marked as neither liberal nor conservative, it was also an all-purpose route for young people who aspired to political or judicial positions. In recent decades, former prosecutors have been ubiquitous in public life. President Bill Clinton and multiple Presidential

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