Day: November 24, 2020

You don’t have a ‘right’ to a lawyer when you’re trying to steal an election

By the time of the General Services Administration’s decision to allow President-elect Joe Biden’s transition to proceed, the lawyering intended to keep President Trump in office had descended into a sort of surrealism, with madcap news conferences unspooling conspiracies masterminded by dead Venezuelan dictators, and rivulets of hair color trickling down Rudolph W. Giuliani’s cheeks. This now appears to have been the terminal phase of a project that began with a deeper bench of lawyers and a pile of “legal spaghetti” — to borrow a metaphor from former RNC chairman Michael Steele — thrown at the wall.



Giuliani, personal attorney to U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks as he holds a news conference about the 2020 U.S. presidential election results with fellow Trump attorneys Sidney Powell and Jenna Ellis at Republican National Committee headquarters in Washington, D.C.


© Jonathan Ernst/Reuters
Giuliani, personal attorney to U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks as he holds a news conference about the 2020 U.S. presidential election results with fellow Trump attorneys Sidney Powell and Jenna Ellis at Republican National Committee headquarters in Washington, D.C.

Lawyers for the Trump campaign and its allies had hurled cases

Read More
Posted On :

Priscilla Jana, Lawyer Who Battled Apartheid, Is Dead at 76

Priscilla Jana, a forthright human rights lawyer whose client list embraced both the fabled elite and the foot soldiers of the struggle against apartheid — and who acknowledged crossing a line in her native South Africa between the law courts and the clandestine war to end white minority rule — died on Oct. 10 at a care home in Pretoria. She was 76.

Ismael Momoniat, a senior government official and family friend, did not specify the cause but said her death was not related to the Covid pandemic.

Ms. Jana occupied an ambiguous space in the regimented society imposed by the South African government’s policies of racial separation, which became ever more pervasive after the whites-only National Party took power in 1948, when she was 4 years old.

Ms. Jana was descended from a family of middle-class Indian immigrants, and her status was defined by laws that consigned many people

Read More
Posted On :
Category:

Leon Todd appointed to head Milwaukee Fire and Police Commission

CLOSE

Leon Todd (Photo: City of Milwaukee)

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett has nominated Leon Todd, an assistant state public defender, to succeed Griselda Aldrete as executive director of the Milwaukee Fire and Police Commission.

His appointment requires approval by the Common Council.

In a statement Tuesday, Barrett called Todd the “ideal candidate” to lead the commission, which has experienced significant turmoil and turnover in recent years.

“I believe that he will bring the leadership necessary to oversee the Commission in an equitable and just manner,” Barrett said in the statement. 

According to the city, Todd has been an assistant public defender in the Office of the State Public Defender Appellate Division since 2014, a role in which he has argued cases before the state Supreme Court. The statement said he had represented incarcerated clients across the state.

He previously represented low-income clients in cases involving housing, family, public benefits and

Read More
Posted On :
Category:

Divorce court is normally quiet during the holiday season, but this year it’s booming



a pair of glasses on a table: Divorces are on the rise. Thiago Santos/iStock/Getty


© Provided by INSIDER
Divorces are on the rise. Thiago Santos/iStock/Getty

  • Inquiries about how to file for divorce have increased 34% year-over-year, and divorce lawyers have anecdotally noticed a spike during the holidays, a time when there’s typically a lull in these cases.
  • Divorce lawyers told Insider the nature of the pandemic has led to feelings of desperation and contempt and pushed couples to ignore previous holiday niceties.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Divorce lawyers are gearing up for their busiest holiday season ever.

From the Jewish New Year in September through Thanksgiving, Christmas, and up until the New Year, there’s typically a lull in court filings and hearings, they told Insider.

But, they say, heightened stress, anxiety, and bitterness due to the coronavirus pandemic is giving them some work to do.

July survey data from Legal Templates, an online database of legal documents, found a 34% increase in

Read More
Posted On :
Category:

Home Depot settles $17.5 million lawsuit after data breach

Home Depot, a Georgia-based home improvement store, will pay a $17.5 million settlement to 46 states including Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana regarding a 2014 data breach, officials announced Tuesday.



a large orange sign that is in front of a building: Home Depot.


© Enquirer file
Home Depot.

The breach exposed the payment card information of approximately 40 million Home Depot consumers nationwide, according to a release. 

Loading...

Load Error

Hackers gained access to The Home Depot’s network and deployed malware on the company’s self-checkout point-of-sale system during the breach, the release states. Hackers were able to obtain self-checkout lane users’ payment card information between April 10, 2014 and Sept. 13, 2014.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost says Ohio will collect $656,210 and some change through the settlement. Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron says Kentucky will receive just over $188,570. Indiana will receive $520,962, according to Indiana Attorney General Curtis

Read More
Posted On :
Category:

Gift from Rose Law Firm funds public interest fellowships | William H. Bowen School of Law

The UA Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law has received a gift from Rose Law Firm as part of its 200th anniversary philanthropic initiative. The law school will use the funds to create two public interest fellowships.

“Rose Law Firm has been blessed to survive and thrive for two centuries. It is in that spirit of gratitude that we have committed to give back to our community in honor of our 200th anniversary. These gifts will benefit several legal aid, nonprofit and educational institutions in our state, including the UA Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law,” said managing member Robyn Allmendinger.

The public interest fellowship is an emerging initiative at Bowen. Through these fellowships, the school will provide monetary stipends to student fellows filling unpaid positions providing public service during the summer semester.  The program supports Bowen’s core values of access to justice, public service,

Read More
Posted On :
Category:

Supreme Court dismisses company’s cruel and unusual punishment claim

In January 2020, the Supreme Court of Canada heard a case that made headlines because it raised a provocative question: Can corporations be subject to cruel and unusual punishment?




Read more:
Supreme Court: Can a corporation be subjected to cruel and unusual punishment?


While the question might strike the ordinary person as amusing, by the time the Attorney General of Québec vs. 9147-0732 Québec Inc. case arrived at Canada’s top court, the stakes were high. That’s because some established elements of corporate and criminal law were thrown into doubt when the case was decided by a 2-1 majority) of the Québec Court of Appeal in favour of a Québec contracting company.

The company had challenged what it thought was an unreasonably high mandatory minimum fine that it claimed could push it into bankruptcy. It argued the fine, upwards of $30,000, was an over-the-top consequence for doing renovation work without a

Read More
Posted On :
Category:

‘Uncle Frank’ cast on why Wilmington was perfect for Amazon Prime film

WILMINGTON – As Peter Macdissi drove through rural Pender County in May 2019, not even the stuffy early summer humidity could ruin the view.

Behind the wheel of a vintage Chrysler convertible on a deserted road, he marveled at the quiet natural beauty surrounding him – all as a camera on the other side of the windshield captured the scene for Amazon Studios’ new film “Uncle Frank.”

“I just kind of looked out as we drove and said, ‘Wow, the South is so beautiful,’” Macdissi said.

It was an unscripted moment, and one Macdissi said writer/director Alan Ball – who is also his longtime partner – debated whether or not to include in the film. 

In the end, it did make the final cut of the intimate family drama, out Wednesday on Amazon Prime. The aside from Macdissi offers a fleeting but genuine glimpse into he and the cast’s fascination

Read More
Posted On :
Category:

Kane County’s law library to temporarily close

The Kane County Law Library and Self-Help Legal Center, located in the Kane County Judicial Center, will be closed Nov. 30 to Feb. 1 due to concerns about COVID-19.

But services will be available by phone, email, social media and a chat service.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

“People can still ask us for help in how to attend Zoom court, how to start a legal case, how to find basic legal forms, how to look for an attorney, how to e-file, etc.,” Halle Cox. the library director, said in a news release.

The free call-in Divorce and Family Law Help service also will continue for people representing themselves. For more information, call (630) 406-7126 or visit kclawlibrary.org.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

Source Article Read More

Posted On :
Category:

Kim Kardashian West meets with Oklahoma death-row inmate in push for criminal justice reform

Kim KardashianKimberly (Kim) Noel Kardashian WestKardashian West celebrates after Biden-Harris victory Kanye West received 60,000 votes in the presidential election Kanye West says he’s casting his first presidential vote for himself MORE West traveled to Oklahoma to visit death row inmate Julius Jones on Monday, according to a press release, the reality TV star’s latest effort calling for criminal justice reform.

Kardashian West met with the Oklahoma State Penitentiary inmate, convicted of shooting a white businessman in 1999, along with his lawyer Dale Baich. Jones was found guilty of first-degree murder in 2002 and was sentenced to death, but has maintained his innocence throughout his time on death row, according to Fox News.

She also met with Jones’s family at the Tabernacle Baptist Church in Oklahoma City to further discuss his case.

Kardashian West, a prison reform advocate, has worked to commute the sentences of various inmates in recent

Read More
Posted On :