We asked officials about law-breaking Boston police officers. Here’s what they said

The Globe found dozens of Boston police officers whose legal problems just melted away.

The story focused in part on a 2013 car crash caused by then-Detective Robert Tully, who was driving an unmarked cruiser near his home in suburban Rockland. Tully crossed the centerline and hit a car driven by a nurse coming home from work, sending both of them to the hospital.

Hospital records showed Tully had booze on his breath, was slurring his words, and his blood alcohol content was 2.5 times the legal limit. He was never charged with driving under the influence.

The victim’s father asked Rockland police and the Plymouth District Attorney’s Office to request Tully’s toxicology reports from the hospital, but there is no evidence that they ever did. Boston police also failed to investigate thoroughly.

In reporting the story, the Globe received the following statements from public officials, police, and prosecutors:

Boston

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Art and artists in martial-law Manila

It was November 1972. Martial law had been inflicted upon the land, following the fake ambush of Defense Secretary Juan Ponce Enrile. My magazine the Graphic had been padlocked, along with the rest of the magazines and newspapers, except for the crony paper Daily Express. I was out of a job, like many in media.

A few months later, while trying to earn a living translating lachrymose Spanish-language comics into Tagalog, courtesy of Morita Roces, I learned that Purita Kalaw Ledesma, the founder of the Art Association of the Philippines (AAP), had been looking high and low for me. It turned out that Mrs. Ledesma needed, not a critic (who would just quarrel with her), but a collaborating writer who, as she pointed out good-naturedly, knew “next to nothing about art.” The task was to write a history of the AAP.

That was my introduction to the world of Philippine

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Police use water cannons as they clash with thousands of protesters in France

Police clashed with demonstrators who took to the streets in France today to protest against a proposed security law which civil liberties campaigners say would impinge on freedom of information and media rights.

The pending legislation would create a new criminal offence for publishing images of police officers with intent to cause them harm. Offenders would face a maximum penalty of up to one year in prison and a 45,000 euro (£40,000) fine.

The government says the proposal is intended to protect police officers from online calls for violence. 

But critics fear that, if enacted, the measure would endanger journalists and other observers who take videos of officers at work, especially during violent demonstrations. 

In Paris, an estimated 7,000 demonstrators today gathered on the Trocadero square near the Eiffel Tower, chanting ‘Freedom, freedom’ and ‘Everyone wants to film the police.’

It is understood roughly 22,000 people took part in demonstrations

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My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell helped pay for suspected Kenosha shooter Kyle Rittenhouse’s $2M bail, attorney says

Kyle Rittenhouse, the teen accused in the fatal shooting of two people in August during protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin, was released from custody after posting $2 million in bail, according to the county’s sheriff’s department.

Rittenhouse was released Friday afternoon after the $2 million was posted through his attorney, Kenosha County Sheriff’s Department spokesman Sgt. David Wright told CNN.

CNN has reached out to attorneys for Rittenhouse for comment.

Attorney Lin Wood said in a tweet on Friday that Mike Lindell, CEO of My Pillow, Inc., and actor Ricky Schroder helped raise the “required $2M cash bail” for Rittenhouse.

“God bless ALL who donated to help #FightBack raise required $2M cash bail. Special thanks to Actor Ricky Schroder @rickyshroder1 & Mike Lindell @realMikeLindell for putting us over the top. Kyle is SAFE. Thanks to ALL who helped this boy,” read the tweet.

Rittenhouse faces charges that he allegedly killed Anthony

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‘There will never be anyone like him’: Well-known lawyer Charles Salvagio dies unexpectedly at Vestavia Hills home

Charles Salvagio, a longtime and well-known criminal defense attorney in Birmingham, died unexpectedly at his Vestavia Hills home.

The 66-year-old Salvagio died Friday after feeling ill for a couple of weeks. His wife, Gina, found him unresponsive and was coached through CPR by a Vestavia Hills police dispatcher until paramedics arrived but it was too late. In addition to his wife, he is survived by his 13-year-old son, Sal, and 16-year-old daughter Gabriela.

“It’s devastating,’’ said attorney and best friend Greg Cox. “He will be sorely missed.”

Salvagio represented many notorious clients over his decades long career. Some of his notable cases include the trial of Charleston Wells, a then-teenage defendant charged with the slaying of Iraqi war veteran Mike Gilotti outside his Hoover home in January 2016. Wells, who prosecutors claimed was the triggerman, was acquitted on the murder charge. Well-known attorney Tom Mesereau, of Los Angeles, also represented

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T&T gov’t bans all Christmas parties in the public sector, urges private sector to do same

SCARBOROUGH, Tobago (CMC)— The Trinidad and Tobago government Saturday announced a total ban on Christmas parties within the public sector, while also urging the private sector to do the same. The Government also announced a TT$30 million (One TT dollar=US$0.16 cents) initiative aimed at assisting persons who have lost their jobs, or have fallen on hard times as a result of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley and Health Minister Terrence Deyalsingh told a news conference here that instructions will be given to the appropriate public sector officials to ensure that government funding for Christmas parties over the coming weeks will not be entertained.

“There is to be no state-sponsored or Christmas party in the public sector,’ Rowley said, acknowledging that the new order would have an effect on the economies of “those who supply the Christmas party, but this is to curb the spread of the

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Republican leaders ask Michigan election board to delay certification of results, in latest GOP effort to cast doubt on the vote

The heads of the Republican National Committee and Michigan Republican Party issued a joint statement Saturday calling for Michigan’s state canvassing board to delay certification of the results of the election, marking the latest attempt by party leaders to intervene in the state’s electoral process.

In the letter — signed by RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel, who is from Michigan, and state GOP Chair Laura Cox — the officials ask the canvassing board to adjourn for 14 days and allow for a “full audit and investigation” before they convene to certify the state’s election results, a procedural step that is set to take place on Monday afternoon.

“This board faces a stark choice,” the letter reads, citing claims of “numerical anomalies” and “procedural irregularities” that they say would leave “the distrust and sense of procedural disenfranchisement felt by many Michigan voters to fester for years” if ignored by the board.

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Indiana attorney general must pay $19K in disciplinary case

The Indiana Supreme Court has ordered state Attorney General Curtis Hill to pay more than $19,000 in expenses in a disciplinary case stemming from allegations he groped a state lawmaker and three other women during a party.

The order issued Friday by the high court and agreed to by the five justices directs Hill to pay $19,068.54 in a check made payable to the clerk of the court.

That amount is one-third of the $57,000 Indiana’s attorney disciplinary commission had asked the court in September to order Hill, a Republican, to pay toward expenses in the groping case. The commission’s proposed bill had included about $8,000 in investigation and litigation costs and nearly $49,000 for former Supreme Court Justice Myra Selby’s work as the case’s hearing officer.

Hill disputed the commission’s proposal in an October filing, with his lawyer proposing that he instead pay a total of about $17,400 and

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Blacks, Hispanics and Asians are still dying from covid-19 at higher rates than Whites

Dennis Bannister’s daughter, Demi, was the first to die.

She was only 28, a beloved third-grade teacher who likely caught the virus during a training at her Columbia, S.C., school district. Doctors diagnosed her with a bladder infection, and by the time they realized their mistake, it was too late. Not long after, the family’s matriarch, Shirley, 57, complained of difficulty breathing. She was twice sent home from the emergency room before returning by ambulance and being put on a ventilator. She died soon after.

Which left Dennis Bannister, childless and a widower, sitting on his porch last month, staring at the last of the green leaves and mourning. Why, he pondered, had the virus hit his family so hard, and not just them, but so many African Americans? Was there something that made them particularly vulnerable? Had they gotten the right care?

“Folks think maybe they saw an African

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Experts: Officials failed Kansas student twice in rape case

Nearly a year after Douglas County prosecutors dismissed false report charges against a KU law student who said she’d been raped by a classmate, a lawsuit and experts say Title IX investigators at the university doubled down on a flawed police investigation, failing her a second time.

The university’s handling of the case, said incoming Douglas County District Attorney Suzanne Valdez, mirrored the skepticism towards stories of sexual assault seen in messaging from the Federal Department of Education and the Lawrence Police Department investigation, The Kansas City Star reports.

The lawsuit, filed by the student against the University of Kansas and the City of Lawrence, represents the first public accounting of the university’s handling of the case. The student simultaneously faced criminal charges for filing a false report of rape, but those charges were later dropped.

The lawsuit, filed last month, describes a Title IX investigation that depended

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